This is how you make a start on a more successful life

I don’t have many regrets. Sure—not having travelled as a young man. Not going to a co-educational school (I have always been shy with women). I regret not visiting my old Uncle Ernie in Sussex, when I instead flew home to chase a Burlesque dancer. But most of all, I regret not having heard this advice 20 years ago. Here it is.

In my early days, success to me was all about how many women I could sleep with (a few), how many would sleep with me a second time (very few), making money, sports cars, getting promoted, getting ‘power’, accumulating stuff. I struggled to ever be happy, always wanting more—the next big thing—striving for something just beyond my reach.  In recent years, my friend Richard Sauerman’s writings about success have moved me.  I have started to view success in a very different way.

And I was fortunate to receive a powerful new guiding message when listening to the keynote speaker at a conference I was speaking at in Johannesburg a few months ago. Here is what that major business icon said:

The most important things in life can’t be measured and can’t be bought.

That’s pretty bloody profound. Well, it was to me anyway, and stays in my thoughts daily.

I continue to spend a lot of time thinking about what success means to me. But my assessment has evolved. Now, it’s all about my family and its security and well being. My fathering. A solid and happy marriage. Loving relationships. Making a difference. Realising my potential. Continuing to learn and grow. And being able to increasingly self-determine what I spend my time on. That’s what comes to mind as I write this.

Making a start on a more successful life: Two key steps

Doug Smollan recommends ‘True Success, a book by Tom Morris. And so do I. In it, Morris talks about the ‘Seven Conditions of Success.’ The first talks about needing a clear conception of what we want, a vivid vision, a goal or set of goals powerfully imagined.

Start by examining your life. As Socrates said: ”The unexamined life is not worth living.” Then again, I am a great believer that: “The unlived life is not worth examining!”

1. Write down all the things you don’t like about your life right now (things to change)
2. Write down all the things you do like about your life right now (things to preserve)

Then start eradicating (where feasible) the stuff you don’t like.

In the long run, we only hit what we aim for. Therefore, we’d better aim at something high!

And always remember those very, very insightful words, before it’s too late: “The most important things in life can’t be measured and can’t be bought.”

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(2) Readers Comments

  1. Brilliant post Chris…so true….!

  2. Pingback: 5 golden rules for a longer and more vibrant career, Advertising

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